Archive | June, 2012

Alex Thomson claims he was trapped by Syrian rebels: an ideology that is named negationism

18 Jun

Alex Thomson is Channel4 correspondent. He went into Syria with an official visa and followed UN observers to Qusayr. There, he was in contact with rebels. According to him, rebels led him in trap so he can be killed by the Syrian army. Here is the story on his blog.

The problem in his story is not in the scoop in itself (rebels trying to make him killed by the regime so Assad get to look bad) which seems possible. But the story appears to be extremely ideological and this trend to doubt the authenticity of what Alex Thomson claims is true.

The Irish UN officer in charge,Mark Reynolds, came over: “Usual rules Alex OK? We’re not responsible for you guys. If you get into trouble we’ll leave you, yes? You’re on your own.” “Yup – no problem Mark. Understood.”
I always say that, sort of assuming it will never come to that in any case.

In these first lines is already something bothering. Going to cover a war zone precisely implies that one is going to get into trouble and there will be danger and risks. This risk is taken by the journalist because it is part of his job to risk his life to get the information out to the world. But if Alex thinks this risk does not exist, what does that tells us about his ethics. What exactly is doing Alex Thomson in Syria thinking he will not get into trouble? Is he ready to take the role of the journalist who risk his life in the sake of the information? He wants to go to Qusayr in the “rebel” zone with the UN.

After a long and dusty half-hour of tracks across olive groves, we arrive at al Qusayr, to the predictable crowd scene.

“The predictable crowd scene” is the first expression of Alex’s ideology. For him, it is a “crowd scene”, a gathering with no individuals, no human beings, no motives, no slogans, no speech or voice, just a “crowd scene”. This is how Alex conceives what is probably a gathering of civilians shouting to the UN observers their suffering from the massacres. These “predictable crowd scenes” are an essential part of the information and of history. They are the proofs of the massacres, of the UN powerlessness but also proofs of UN presence so these massacres are not committed without the world knowing. Men and women who lost sons, daughters, fathers, mothers and sisters, who get slaughtered and they want to tell the UN observers: a “predictable crowd scene”…

How is this scene so predictable? Does Alex thinks these massacres are so numerous that they became common? Why not tell anything about it so? Does he thins it is a game that these people are playing? Rushing to UN observers like kids? Does Alex refers here to the general trend of the Arabs to produce these kind of scenes and to give these kind of images? These people are so predictable, they do not have suffering, no pain, no reasons, no condition, they do not even exist. This is not even a real crowd with real human beings in it but only a scene, transient and melodramatic, just for the show. And Alex thinks it is not even a good show: it is predictable, the scenario is badly written so Alex will try to write a better one.

The UN settles down for a long meeting with the civilian and military leaders here. It looks much like an Afghan “shura” to me. Everyone is cross legged on the cushions around the room, except it is Turkish coffee passed round rather than chai.

This meeting who may have some very interesting informations is also considered as a common oriental scene without any kind of interest. Who are these leaders? How many civilian leaders? How many military leaders? What is the difference between the two? What do they say? Alex is not interested. For him it is an Afghan “shura” like any other. These people are all the same, tribal culture and sitting cross legged on the floor except some are drinking tea and other are drinking coffee. It is the only difference for Alex. Revolutionary leaders meeting UN observers for a whole afternoon in the middle of Syria is not at all surprising because… he saw the same scene in Afghanistan. A tribal Afghan = a revolutionary Syrian, one drinks tea, the other drinks coffee but the fact that they are all sitting on cushion on the floor makes them automatically similar cases.

Alex does not ask himself for one second about any difference: political, national, language, personal, individual or historical. « Looks like an Afghan shura to me » been there, done that… What these people say or what topics they are discussing has absolutely no kind of interest. These are savages sitting on the floor drinking hot beverages.

We settle down to filming outside. The women and boys bring us oranges and chairs in the heat. Shell fragments are produced to be filmed. They explain how the shelling will begin again as soon as we leave – a claim which, by its nature, must remain untested, though there is certainly extensive shell damage in some parts of town here.

Note here that Alex is posing the scene as completely normal. Not a single word or nice adjective in his paper thanking these people who offer him oranges and chairs (so he does not have to sit on the floor like a savage). However, Alex has to stress that the information he is given together with the oranges “by its nature must remain untested”. Choice of the word “untested” is curious though this claim has indeed been tested on multiple occasion. Shelling do arrive as soon as the UN leaves a village. But it is “by its nature” that Alex rejects this information and indicates that it “must” remain rejected despite any proofs he is given.

So we while away the time, waiting for the UN to move – they’re the only way across the lines with any degree of safety of course.

Here and together with the previous paragraph, Alex indicates clearly what he is doing in Syria. He does not come to look for information as he rejects the informations that he is given. He does not care about what the UN is doing as he only sit his ass on a chair eating oranges and waiting for the UN finishes so he can move. What Alex wants to do is to use the UN as a shield so he can cross the lines. This could have an interest if the journalistic goal was to follow the work of the UN observers but Alex has already indicated he could not care less about what the UN is doing.

Alex wants to willingly go in the middle of fire lines but protected by the UN. Alex wants the no man’s land. The grey area in the middle of “both sides” at an equal distance between them. From there he can say: here things are grey, both sides are firing each other in a perfectly equal manner and with perfectly equal motivations with no consideration whatsoever for the weapons or the cause of any of both sides. Both sides can be there melted together in indistinct grey. It is what Alex wants as a scoop and is is predictably what he is going to find because, in a very logical manner, when you go sit in the middle of a no man’s land you are going to get bullets from everyone.

Alex Is impatient. He is visibly not here to listen to the testimony of the inhabitants or to film any proof of the shelling. He does not really believe in these anyway.

But time drags. Our deadline begins to loom.

This very sentence shows all the extent of contempt Alex has toward the situation and the life of the people around him to their very existence. Alex’s “deadline” is more important of course than these meetings between revolutionaries and the UN. His little stupid scoop consisting in going filming bullets in the middle of crossed line of fire is more important than anything revolutionaries have to say to the UN or even the life of people around him. He was duly told that shelling will begin again as soon as UN leaves. This “time drags” is for now the very surviving of the people who gave him oranges but Alex does not even conceive it.

And there’s this really irritating guy who claims to be from “rebel intelligence” and won’t quite accept that we have a visa from the government. In his book foreign journos are people smuggled in from Lebanon illegally and that’s that. We don’t fit his profile.

Here was also an interesting information discarded as a “claim”: revolutionaries have sat up an intelligence service. But for Alex it is another unverifiable “claim” he will not bother to verify. Alex is here again extremely disdainful toward this man and all the stakes that constitutes the verification of his ID. « in his book », Alex knows it completely without needing to read a line. He won’t even imagine that the suspicion about his official visa can be justified. Here Alex lies by omission.

Let’s get back to how things are in the reality: Alex arrives in rebel zone with an official stamp from Bachar al Assad and a van and crew coming directly from Damascus. It could be somehow justified that revolutionaries are getting a bit suspicious. The very meaning of this official stamp indicates Alex is going to give equal credit to “both sides”. An activity which, by its nature, is going to harm the rebel’s cause. This rebel that Alex considers dumb and annoying knows perfectly what the regime does when they deliver an official visa to a foreign journalist. In a very legitimate way, he is suspicious toward the journalist who has agreed to play Assad’s game. He also has to protect himself, his family and friends and his revolutionary cause from any infiltration by Assad’s agents and Alex with his official visa is a suspect. In truth, Alex takes the regime sides and here is how:

First, he supposes that the regime visa is valid for all Syrian territory and indicates that he does not find normal that it becomes suspect in rebel zone. Here it is not normal that one does not accept the official stamp. Just by labelling the ID verification as “annoying”, Alex indicates that he thinks Assad’s flag is supposed to fly over all Syria.

Also Alex led his reader to think that the regime never used any journalist nor did it infiltrate any agent in rebel zone disguised as foreign journalists. A story duly told by Jonathan Littell in his Carnets de Homs. Such a stratagem is completely probable and Alex is lying by omission when he refuses to acknowledge that revolutionary has perfectly good reasons to verify his ID.

Eventually Alex does no conceive one moment what could happen in a reversed case: a case where he would come to Damascus from the rebel area with no official stamp on his passport. He would of course be arrested, probably tortured and most certainly knows it would be crazy just to think of trying the experiment. However he found completely normal to try the experiment in this way: from regime official to rebel area is a profile completely acceptable in his eyes and he finds a bit annoying to be asked questions.

Tired of waiting for the useless UN to end their useless cushion-on-the-floor meeting, he takes the initiative.

We decide to ask for an escort out the safe way we came in. Both sides, both checkpoints will remember our vehicle.

Simply, Alex is incredible. After having written that the UN convoy was the only way with a certain degree of safety, he asks to the one guy who thinks he is a regime agent for a rebel escort to got back to the other side. It comes hard to understand what Alex thinks is the situation here: revolutionaries are going to escort him nicely to the last rebel check point and then he is going to simply drive to the army checkpoint praying for everyone to remember his vehicles and that no one questions to hard the little trips he takes between them?
If it is really the case why ask for a escort for that?

Actually Alex is here building carefully the scenario that is going to happen to him: please could you escort me to the middle of the no man’s land so I can get shot at?

Suddenly four men in a black car beckon us to follow. We move out behind. We are led another route. Led in fact, straight into a free-fire zone. Told by the Free Syrian Army to follow a road that was blocked off in the middle of no-man’s-land.

Remember Alex just asked for an escort. SO maybe these 4 men in a black car could be his escort but he does not indicate any such thing. Alex is in the middle of the no man’s land on a blocked road which was exactly the location where he wanted to go initially. FSA told him this road because it is the road whare he wants to go: Alex wants to pass check points from both sides and predictably there is going to be an area between them that is called a no man’s land and where both sides fire on sight. And predictably the 4 guys in the black car are not going to risk their lives under a rain of bullets to protect the imbecile who wants to go get stuck in the middle.

So Thomson get shot at, he is really really afraid and turns back.

Predictably the black car was there which had led us to the trap. They roared off as soon as we re-appeared.

« Predictably » again. For Thomson this car is waiting “predictably” because he does not want to think of any other possibility. It was predictable this car would be here because it was what Thomson predicted. Maybe this car just waited for Thomson to make a very predictable drive back as soon as he would realise that one get shot at when one gets in the no man’s land. Called a no man’s land for a reason. Maybe this car was checking if he was alive? Alex does not want to think about that. The only reason for this car to be here was that it was predicted. The duality and treason of the Arab is just as predictable as the “crowd scene” , it is in their nature.

I’m quite clear the rebels deliberately set us up to be shot by the Syrian Army. Dead journos are bad for Damascus.
That conviction only strengthened half an hour later when our four friends in the same beaten-up black car suddenly pulled out of a side-street, blocking us from the UN vehicles ahead.
The UN duly drove back past us, witnessed us surrounded by shouting militia, and left town.
Eventually we got out too and on the right route, back to Damascus.

Here is the scoop Alex wanted all along. He went into the no man’s land from the rebel zone, get shot at and so concludes the rebels led him into a trap. That the regime fired on him is no problem at all, still rebels fault. His conviction is reinforced because the rebels prevented him from following the UN half an hour later. For him it is part of the plan. Maybe the rebels just prevented him from getting shot at a second time. Maybe they took the time to negociate a safe passage for him so he could go back to Damascus. Curious enough there is absolutely no detail whatsoever on how he got back. “Eventually we got out too,” funny how time drags now. How? why? at what time? in what conditions? Nothing. Alex wanted to go in the no man’s land and thought that this little tribal meeting was taking too long so he decides to go alone, gets shot at, comes back and finds a conspiracy in the fact he is not allowed to go back with the UN after all.

But of utmost importance is the conclusion Alex wanted that is a model of ideological construction:

In a war where they slit the throats of toddlers back to the spine, what’s the big deal in sending a van full of journalists into the killing zone?
It was nothing personal.

First, Alex put his little fear in perspective of the massacre of 100 people. For him, these things arrive in a war where “they” slit throats so it is normal that “they” send journalist to death. In this general “they”, of course, it is implied that the same “they” are responsible for both events. “They” in Alex story are the revolutionaries and he identifies them clearly as responsible. Then, Alex spreads the idea that “they” are also responsible for the massacre just by not defining who are these “they” who slits throats.
« it was nothing personal » in the form of a paternalist “it is normal”. They, these people, undistinct, with no soul who kills and massacre themselves with no cause nor guilt tried to get me killed but it is not personal. It is in their Arab nature to do that, who am I to judge? They are like that, the situation is like that and Alex is filled with empathy and understanding for the savage nature of the Arab savages.

Alex’s ideology is this: these people (let’s call them arabs but maybe also Afghans who looks very much like them), these people massacre and get journalists massacred. With no cause, no reasons, no revolution, no politics, no surprise (“predictable”). And this is what a war zone looks like in the middle east: all the same, all without any other cause or any other reason than being the nature of the middle east.

And it is this ideology that Alex is going to promote in an interview with Russia Today where he details his story.
Now let’s say for people not as familiar with the media world as is Alex Thomson that going to be interviewed by Russia Today (Putin’s TV) is not completely innocent from an ideological point of view.

In the interview, what comes out the most is the word “both sides” which appears no less than 10 times so he can penetrate deeply in the brain. Let’s examine the passages where “both sides” occurs so we can grasp the ideas hidden behind this “both sides”

Russia Today : Thomson’s mission to Syria was unique in a way, as he was reporting on both sides of the conflict, interviewing both Assad loyalists and rebels (this is introduction)

‘Both sides involved in very dirty tactics’ (this is the title of the interview written very very big)

AT : By and large, when we spoke to Syrian people on both sides of the war, they were pretty honest and pretty straightforward in their assessments of the situation. That was the situation in places like Homs, on both sides, in Houla, on both sides. It was certainly the case on one side in al-Qubair. But when we got to the rebel side of al-Qubair, there was something different and for the first time, we encountered a degree of hostility and suspicion about us, because they had never seen foreign journalists who had a visa from Damascus, who were in the country legally, not illegally. And that immediately aroused suspicion on their part. »

Here, “both sides” is used to show how rebels are different. It is “both sides” all the time until Qusayr where suddenly rebels are not “both sides” at all. After having strike a perfect balance, Alex uses al Qusayr to unbalance things is disfavour of the rebels.

 It is very unusual, almost unheard of, to do the kind of things that we were doing, which is to go from Damascus, cross the lines with the Red Cross and Red Crescent, and talk to both sides.

What Alex is doint is actually very well known and he is not the first to try the “both sides” with a visa from the regime. All those who tried this had the open goal of putting Assad’s regime and rebels on the exact same plan. It is an ideological manipulation as proven by the next question from Russia Today:

RT: So can it be that your willingness to talk to both sides was the reason why the rebels wanted to set you up?

Let’s translate: Is it because the rebels did not accept this ideology that you get yourself into danger? And the anwser of Alex Thomson which should be carved in stone:

AT: That’s certainly possibly the case.

In the “both sides” ideology, things can certainly become possible…

(…)  I’m not angry about it, I’m not upset about it, this is a war and these things will be done. Both sides are involved in very dirty tactics in this war. This is a nasty and dirty war on both sides.

Here “both sides” is uses clearly to make the rebels responsible (but not guilty) of the “very dirty tactics”

RT: So are Assad’s troops mostly responsible for this violence?
AT: No, it’s a war. Both sides are responsible.

Here clearly Both sides is used to take the direct defence of Bashar al Assad. “both sides” and “it’s a war” are used to answer a firm “no” to the question of Assad’s troops responsibility in the violence.

One can conclude from that analysis of Alex’s ideology that his little adventure does not constitutes an irrefutable and objective proof but an ideological story of an adventure more wished than lived and looking to balance the rebels and the regime. This balance once stroke is unbalanced in disfavour of the rebels because it is on this story that Alex tries to get the media focus.

Clausewitz, the one who gives the war a definition told us that “war is the continuation of politics by other means”. To eliminate all politics from the journalistic cover of a war by putting “both sides” on the same level is a ideological negation of the reality. It implies that there are no killer nor victims, no innocents nor guilty, no oppressor nor oppressed, no master nor slaves, no genocide maker nor genocide victims…

This ideology is called negationism

And your ideology, Alex, has to be fought against, nothing personal.

Advertisements

Alex Thomson envoyé à la mort par les rebelles syriens, en fait de l’idéologie négationniste

17 Jun

Alex Thomson est le correspondant de Channel 4. Il est entré en Syrie avec un visa officiel et a suivi les observateurs de l’ONU à Qusayr. Là il est entré en contact avec des rebelles qui l’ont attiré selon lui dans un traquenard pour essayer de le faire tuer par l’armée officielle. Ici son récit sur son blog.

Le problème de son récit n’est pas dans le scoop en tant que tel (les rebelles ont essayé de tendre un piège à un journaliste occidental) qui est possible mais surtout que ce récit est profondément idéologique ce qui permet de mettre en doute son authenticité.

The Irish UN officer in charge,Mark Reynolds, came over: “Usual rules Alex OK? We’re not responsible for you guys. If you get into trouble we’ll leave you, yes? You’re on your own.” “Yup – no problem Mark. Understood.”
I always say that, sort of assuming it will never come to that in any case.

C’est dès les premières lignes qu’apparaît le problème. Aller couvrir une zone de guerre suppose précisément qu’on se met en danger et qu’il y aura des problèmes. Ce risque est assumé car la fonction du journaliste est (aussi) de se mettre en danger pour rapporter de l’information mais si Alex assume que ce danger n’existe pas, sa fonction et son éthique de journaliste est à remettre en cause : que va faire Alex Thomson en Syrie pensant qu’il ne lui arrivera rien ? Est il prêt à assumer l’éthique du journaliste se mettant en danger pour le droit à l’information si ce danger n’existe pas dans son esprit ? Il veut aller à Qusayr en zone rebelle avec l’ONU.

After a long and dusty half-hour of tracks across olive groves, we arrive at al Qusayr, to the predictable crowd scene.

The predictable crowd scene est la première expression de l’idéologie de Alex. Pour Alex c’est une « crowd scene » un attroupement. aucun individu, aucun être humain, aucun motif, aucun slogan, aucune parole, juste une « scène de foule ». C’est ainsi qu’Alex conçoit ce qui est probablement un rassemblement de civil hurlant les souffrances de leur massacres aux observateurs de l’ONU. Ces « predictable crowd scene » sont des éléments essentiels de l’information et de l’histoire. Elles seront les preuves des massacres, de l’impuissance de l’ONU mais aussi de sa présence et que ces massacres ne se sont pas fait à huis clos. Des hommes et des femmes qui ont perdu des fils, des filles, des pères, des mères qui se font cordialement massacré et qui cherchent à le dire aux observateurs de l’ONU impuissant : une predictable crowd scene…

En quoi est-elle predictable ? Est-ce que Alex pense que les massacres sont tellement nombreux qu’ils en sont devenus un lieux communs ? Pourquoi ne pas le dire ? Est-ce qu’il pense que c’est un jeu que joue ces gens : se ruer sur les observateurs ? Ou alors est-ce que Alex fait référence à la tendance générale de l’arabe à former ce genre de scène, à donner ce genre d’image ? Ces gens sont tellement prévisibles, ils n’ont pas de peine, pas de souffrance, pas de raisons, pas de condition, ils n’existent même pas. Ce n’est même pas une foule avec des humains mais une scène de foule, éphémere et théatrale, juste pour le show. Alex n’est même pas divertit c’est “predictable”, il trouve que le scénario est mal écrit. Il va donc essayer d’en écrire un meilleur.

The UN settles down for a long meeting with the civilian and military leaders here. It looks much like an Afghan “shura” to me. Everyone is cross legged on the cushions around the room, except it is Turkish coffee passed round rather than chai.

Le meeting qui aurait pu peut-être révéler certaines informations intéressantes est lui aussi évacué comme une scène orientale classique et donc sans intérêt. Qui sont ces chefs, combien de chefs civils, combien de militaires, quelle est la différence entre les deux, que disent-ils ? Alex n’est pas intéressé. Pour lui c’est une « shoura » afghane comme une autre, ces gens sont tous les mêmes, tribaux et assis par terre sauf que les uns boivent du thé et les autres du café. C’est la seule différence aux yeux d’Alex. Qu’une assemblée de chefs révolutionnaires se tienne pendant une heure avec des observateurs de l’ONU en plein milieu de la Syrie ne l’étonne pas du tout car… il a vu la même scène en Afghanistan. Un tribal afghan = un révolutionnaire Syrien, les uns boivent du thé, les autres du café mais le fait qu’ils s’assoient en rond sur des coussins en font automatiquement des cas similaires. Alex ne s’interroge pas une seule seconde sur aucune différence : politique, nationale, linguistique, personnelles, individuelles ou historique. « looks like an Afghan Shoura to me » et j’en ai déjà vu alors celle là ou une autre… Ce que ces gens disent ou font ou de quoi ils discutent ou pourquoi ils meurent n’a aucun intéret. Ce sont des sauvages assis par terre en buvant des boissons chaudes…

We settle down to filming outside. The women and boys bring us oranges and chairs in the heat. Shell fragments are produced to be filmed. They explain how the shelling will begin again as soon as we leave – a claim which, by its nature, must remain untested, though there is certainly extensive shell damage in some parts of town here.

Notons qu’Alex pose la scène comme parfaitement normale et naturelle. Pas un mot ni le moindre adjectif de remerciement dans son papier pour des gens qui sont venus offrir des oranges et des chaises (afin que lui ne soit pas assis par terre comme un sauvage). Par contre Alex précise que l’information qui lui est offerte en même temps que les oranges « doit par sa nature même » rester « untested ». Le choix du mot « untested » est curieux, il se trouve que cette affirmation a bel et bien été testée en de multiples occasions : les bombardement arrivent dès que l’ONU quitte un village. Mais c’est par nature que Alex la rejette et indique qu’elle doit être rejetée malgré les preuves qu’on lui apporte.

So we while away the time, waiting for the UN to move – they’re the only way across the lines with any degree of safety of course.

Ici et avec le paragraphe précédent, Alex indique très clairement ce qu’il vient faire en Syrie. Il ne vient pas chercher des informations puisqu’il rejette celles qu’on lui offre. Il ne s’intéresse pas à ce que fait l’ONU puisqu’il se contente d’attendre qu’ils aient fini pour bouger. Alex veut utiliser l’ONU comme un bouclier pour passer d’une ligne à l’autre. Cela aurait une certaine utilité si le but journalistique était de suivre le travail des observateurs mais Alex indique bien qu’il s’en fiche éperdument. Alex cherche volontairement à se retrouver entre deux lignes de tirs, mais protégé par l’ONU. Alex veut le no man’s land, la zone grise où il sera au milieu, entre les « deux côtés » à égale distance et d’où il pourra se permettre de dire : ici c’est gris, les deux côtés tirent l’un sur l’autre de façon parfaitement égale avec des motivations parfaitement égales sans aucune considération pour l’arme ou la cause d’aucun des deux camps, fondus ensemble dans un gris indistinct. C’est ce qu’Alex recherche comme scoop et c’est évidemment ce qu’il va trouver puisque, de façon très logique, lorsqu’on se pose au milieu d’un no man’s land on se fait tirer dessus par tout le monde. Alex s’impatiente, il n’est visiblement pas là pour entendre le témoignage des habitants ni filmer les preuves des bombardements auxquelles il ne croit pas vraiment.

But time drags. Our deadline begins to loom.

Cette phrase à elle seule porte toute l’étendue du profond mépris d’Alex à l’égard de ce qu’il vit et des gens chez qui il est, de leur existence même. Sa « deadline » est plus importante évidemment que ce meeting entre les chefs révolutionnaires et l’ONU. Son petit scoop merdique d’aller se mettre en danger sous les balles est plus important que le travail de l’ONU ou que ce que les révolutionnaires ont à dire où même que la vie des gens qui l’entourent. On lui a pourtant précisé que ça allait bombarder dès qu’il serait parti. Ce « time drags » qui met en danger sa « deadline » est encore la seule garantie de survie des gens qui lui ont offert des oranges mais Alex ne semble même pas le concevoir.

And there’s this really irritating guy who claims to be from “rebel intelligence” and won’t quite accept that we have a visa from the government. In his book foreign journos are people smuggled in from Lebanon illegally and that’s that. We don’t fit his profile. »

Il y avait pourtant ici encore une info particulièrement intéressante : Les révolutionnaires ont un service de renseignement. Mais pour Alex c’est encore un « claim » invérifiable et surtout ne méritant pas d’être vérifié. Alex est encore profondément méprisant à l’égard de cet homme et des enjeux que constitue la vérification de son identité. « in his book », Alex le connaît en entier sans l’avoir lu et ne prendra même pas la peine d’imaginer que la suspicion sur son visa officiel puisse être justifié. Ici Alex ment volontairement par omission.

Remettons les choses dans l’ordre : Alex se pointe en zone rebelle avec un visa officiel du régime et un van qui vient directement de Damas. C’est assez normal que les révolutionnaires se méfient : la simple présence du Visa indique déjà que Alex entend donner un poids équivalent aux fameuses « deux versions » ce qui par nature va nuire à la cause des révolutionnaires. Ce révolutionnaire que Alex prend pour un imbécile sait très bien ce que le régime fait lorsqu’il donne un visa officiel à un journaliste étranger et il est donc légitimement suspicieux sur la présence d’Alex qui a accepté de jouer ce jeu là. Il cherche à se protéger, lui, les siens et sa famille et sa révolution des infiltration des agents du régime et Alex, avec son visa officiel est suspect. Alex en réalité prend ici parti pour le régime.

D’abord il suppose que le visa du régime vaut pour tout le territoire et indique qu’il ne trouve pas normal qu’il soit suspect en zone révolutionnaire. Ici ce n’est pas normal qu’on n’accepte pas le tampon officiel. Rien qu’en décrivant la vérificationd’identité comme annoying, Alex indique qu’il pense que le drapeau d’Assad doit flotter sur toute la Syrie.

Ensuite Alex suppose que le régime n’a jamais instrumentalisé de journaliste ni jamais infiltré d’agents en zone rebelles en les faisant passer pour des journalistes étrangers. Une histoire pourtant relatée par Jhonatan Littel dans ses carnets de Homs. Des journalistes avec visa officiel prenant parti pour le régime ou le régime essayant d’infiltrer les zones rebelles avec ce stratagème, c’est parfaitement probable et Alex ment par omission en refusant de le mentionner les raisons du révolutionnaire de vérifier son identité.

Enfin Alex ne conçoit pas un seul instant ce qui pourrait se passer dans le cas inverse : le cas où il se pointerait à Damas sans visa officiel. Il serait évidemment arrêté, probablement torturé et vraisemblablement sait qu’il serait complètement fou de tenter l’expérience dans ce sens. Par contre, il trouve parfaitement normal de la tenter dans le sens inverse : se balader en zone rebelle avec un visa du gouvernement c’est un profil tout à fait acceptable et c’est « annoying » qu’on lui pose des questions. Lassé d’attendre il prend l’initiative:

We decide to ask for an escort out the safe way we came in. Both sides, both checkpoints will remember our vehicle.

Il est fantastique Alex Thomson tout de même. Après avoir écrit noir sur blanc que l’ONU était « the only safe way » il décide de demander à celui qui visiblement le soupconne d’être un agent du régime de lui fournir une escorte pour retourner de l’autre côté. C’est difficile d’imaginer ce que Alex conçoit exactement de la situation : les révolutionnaires vont l’escorter gentillement jusqu’au dernier check point rebelle et puis ensuite il va passer tranquillement jusqu’au check point de l’armée en priant pour que tout le monde se rappelle son véhicule et supposant qu’aucun camp ne trouve louche qu’il se ballade entre les deux ?
Si c’est vraiment le plan, pourquoi alors demander une escorte ?
Alex ici est en train de construire exactement ce qui va lui arriver : s’il vous plait, escortez moi jusqu’à ce que j’aille me faire tirer dessus par le régime dans le no man’s land.

Suddenly four men in a black car beckon us to follow. We move out behind. We are led another route. Led in fact, straight into a free-fire zone. Told by the Free Syrian Army to follow a road that was blocked off in the middle of no-man’s-land.

Alex vient de demander une escorte, il semble que ces 4 men in a black car soit son escorte mais il n’en indique rien. Alex est au milieu du no man’s land sur une route bloquée ce qui est précisément l’endroit où il voulait aller à l’origine. Les FSA lui ont indiqué d’aller sur cette route parce que c’était la route où il voulait aller : il veut repasser les check points des deux cotés, fatalement, il y a un moment entre les deux où c’est un no man’s land où ça tire à vue. Et fatalement les 4 types en voiture noire ne vont pas aller se prendre une pluie de balle pour protéger un imbécile qui veut aller au milieu.

Thomson se fait donc tirer dessus, il a très très peur et fait demi tour.

Predictably the black car was there which had led us to the trap. They roared off as soon as we re-appeared.

« Predictably » de nouveau. Pour Thomson, cette voiture attend de façon prévisible car il ne veut pas penser à aucune autre possibilité. C’est simplement prévisible que la voiture soit là parce que c’était ce que Thosmon prévoyait. Peut être que la voiture a attendu le retour de Thomson qui allait faire un demi-tour parfaitement prévisible en s’appercevant qu’au milieu du no man’s land on se fait tirer dessus. Peut être que cette voiture attend pour vérifier qu’il est en vie ? Alex n’y pense pas, la seule raison pour cette voiture d’attendre son retour est que c’était prévisible qu’elle soit là. La dualité et la traîtrise de l’arabe est aussi prévisible que la « crowd scene », c’est dans leur nature.

I’m quite clear the rebels deliberately set us up to be shot by the Syrian Army. Dead journos are bad for Damascus.
That conviction only strengthened half an hour later when our four friends in the same beaten-up black car suddenly pulled out of a side-street, blocking us from the UN vehicles ahead.
The UN duly drove back past us, witnessed us surrounded by shouting militia, and left town.
Eventually we got out too and on the right route, back to Damascus.

Là est le scoop que voulait Alex. Il est allé dans le no man’s land à partir de la zone rebelle, s’est fait tirer dessus et donc conclu que les rebelles l’ont attiré dans un piège. Aucun problème que le régime lui tire dessus, c’est la faute des rebelles. Sa conviction est renforcée car ensuite les rebelles l’ont empêché de suivre l’ONU. Pour lui ça fait partie du plan. Peut-être que les rebelles ont simplement empêché Alex de retourner se faire tirer dessus une demi-heure plus tard. Peut être que les rebelles ont pris le temps de lui négocier un passage sans risques avec l’armée de façon à ce qu’il puisse retourner à Damas. Curieusement, il n’y a pas un mot sur la façon dont il est revenu. « eventually we got out too » comment, pourquoi, à quelle heure, dans quelles conditions ? Rien. Alex voulait aller dans le no man’s land avec l’ONU et trouvait que ce petit meeting tribal durait un peu longtemps alors il a décidé d’y aller seul, il s’est fait tirer dessus, il revient et trouve conspiration dans le fait qu’on ne le laisse pas repartir avec l’ONU directement.

Mais c’est surtout la conclusion à laquelle voulait arriver Thomson qui est un modèle d’idéologie:

In a war where they slit the throats of toddlers back to the spine, what’s the big deal in sending a van full of journalists into the killing zone?
It was nothing personal.

D’abord, Alex met en perspective sa petite aventure personnelle (de laquelle il sort sain et sauf) avec le massacre de 100 personne. Pour lui ces choses arrivent dans une guerre où « ils » coupent des gorges donc normal qu’ « ils » envoient des journalistes se faire tuer. Dans ce « ils » indistinct, évidemment, on sous entend que le même « ils » sont responsable des deux événements. « Ils » dans l’histoire d’Alex ce sont les rebelles et il les identifie clairement comme responsables. Puis Alex diffuse l’idée que « ils » sont responsable aussi du massacre sans clairement définir qui « ils ».

« it was nothing personal » en forme de c’est normal. Ils, ces gens, indistincts, sans âme, qui se tuent et se massacrent sans cause ni culpabilité cherchent à me faire tuer ce n’est pas personnel. C’est dans leur nature d’arabe de faire ce genre de chose, on se tue et se massacre sans rien de personnel, c’est juste qu’ils sont comme ça, la situation est comme ça1 Alex ne leur en veut pas dans un grand élan d’empathie et de compréhension pour la nature sanglante de ces gens moyenâgeux.

L’idéologie d’Alex et de son « nothing personal » est celle ci : ces gens (les arabes dirons nous mais peut-être aussi ces Afghans qui leur ressemble) ces gens là massacrent et font massacrer des journalistes. Sans cause, sans raison, sans révolution, sans politique, sans surprise (« predictable ») et c’est à ça que ressemble une zone de guerre au moyen-orient, toutes semblables, toutes sans cause ni autre raison que la nature moyen-orientale qui crée ce genre de situation.

C’est cette idéologie que Alex va aller promouvoir ensuite sur Russia Today dans une interview où il détaille son histoire.

Rappelons pour ceux qui ne sont pas aussi familier du monde des média que l’est Alex Thomson qu’aller se faire interviewer sur Russia Today n’est pas du tout innocent sur le plan idéologique.

Dans l’interview, ce qui ressort c’est surtout le mot « both sides » qui réapparaît pas moins de 10 fois, histoire qu’il pénètre vraiment profondément le cerveau. Examinons donc les passages où Alex utilise cette idée de « both sides » pour regarder de plus près les idées qu’il amène dérrière.

RT : Thomson’s mission to Syria was unique in a way, as he was reporting on both sides of the conflict, interviewing both Assad loyalists and rebels (c’est l’introduction)

‘Both sides involved in very dirty tactics’ (c’est le titre de l’article écrit en très très gros)

AT : By and large, when we spoke to Syrian people on both sides of the war, they were pretty honest and pretty straightforward in their assessments of the situation. That was the situation in places like Homs, on both sides, in Houla, on both sides. It was certainly the case on one side in al-Qubair. But when we got to the rebel side of al-Qubair, there was something different and for the first time, we encountered a degree of hostility and suspicion about us, because they had never seen foreign journalists who had a visa from Damascus, who were in the country legally, not illegally. And that immediately aroused suspicion on their part. »

Ici le both sides est utilisé pour montrer que les rebelles sont différents. C’est « both sides » tout le temps jusqu’à Qusayr où là, les rebelles ne sont plus du tout both sides. Après avoir parfaitement équilibrer la balance, Alex utilise Al Qusayr pour la faire pencher en défaveur des rebelles.

 It is very unusual, almost unheard of, to do the kind of things that we were doing, which is to go from Damascus, cross the lines with the Red Cross and Red Crescent, and talk to both sides.

La pratique de Alex est en réalité ultra courante et il n’est pas le premier à tenter l’expérience du « Both Sides » avec un visa du régime. Chez chacun de ceux qui ont tenté l’expérience, la volonté de mettre sur un plan équivalent le régime et les rebelles était évidente. C’est une manipulation purement idéologique ainsi que le montre la question de Russia Today :

RT: So can it be that your willingness to talk to both sides was the reason why the rebels wanted to set you up?

En clair : est-ce que c’est cette idéologie que les rebelles ont refusé qui vous a mis en danger ? Et la réponse d’anthologie de Alex :

AT: That’s certainly possibly the case.

Dans l’idéologie du Both Sides, les choses deviennent probablement certaine…

(…)  I’m not angry about it, I’m not upset about it, this is a war and these things will be done. Both sides are involved in very dirty tactics in this war. This is a nasty and dirty war on both sides.

Ici « both sides » est très clairement utilisé pour le rebelles responsables (mais non coupable) des very dirty tactics.

RT: So are Assad’s troops mostly responsible for this violence?
AT: No, it’s a war. Both sides are responsible.

Ici, de façon limpide, l’utilisation du « both sides » est utilisée pour la défense directe de Bachar al Assad. Both sides et it’s a war est utilisé pour répondre « non » à la question de la responsabilité de Bachar dans les violence.

On peut donc conclure de cette analyse de l’idéologie d’Alex que sa mésaventure ne constitue en aucun cas une preuve irréfutable et objective mais un récit idéologique d’une aventure voulue plus que vécue et cherchant à équilibrer le régime et les rebelles. Cet équilibre est ensuite démonté en défaveur des rebelles puisque c’est Al Qusayr qui constitue le scoop et sur lequel Alex veut attirer l’attention médiatique.

Clausewitz, l’homme qui a définit la guerre explique que « la guerre est la continuation de la politique par d’autre moyens » Éliminer toute politique de la couverture d’une guerre en mettant « both sides » sur un même plan c’est une négation idéologique de la réalité. C’est supposer qu’il n’y a plus ni bourreaux, ni victimes, ni innocents ni coupables, ni oppresseur ni opprimé, ni voleur ni volé, ni exploiteur ni exploité.

Cette idéologie, c’est du négationnisme.

Et ton idéologie, Alex, doit être combattue, nothing personal..

Bernard Henri Levy dans le Serment de Tobrouk: le ridicule anachronique du socialisme colonial

11 Jun

Comment expliquer le flop flamboyant du film de BHL ? Assassiné par les critiques malgré les soutiens très en vue et très médiatiques de l’écrivain.

Alors que son rêve d’être l’homme par qui la bonne guerre arrive semble se concrétiser, BHL paradoxalement se retrouve héros de la fable « le roi est nu ». Aucun de ses détracteurs n’avait réussis l’exploit que BHL vient de réussir avec son film en se tirant une balle dans le pied.

Les critiques cinéma sont unanime pour saluer une heure et demi d’agonie devant l’ego surdimensionné de celui qui n’a pas trouvé en Libye d’autre sujet que lui-même.

Pour le Nouvel Observateur, BHL se tire une balle dans le pied

Pour Le Monde, il est le disciple involontaire de Charlie Chaplin

Pour La Croix c’est du narcissime sur grand écran

Pour Libération, “le serment de Mabrouk est sans conteste le meilleur film de Sacha Baron Cohen”

Sur le Huffington Post on trouve quelques extraits et la bande annonce du film pour se faire une idée

Le petit jeu de BHL sur la Libye a marché un moment puis avec le serment de Tobrouk, tout s’écroule. Car BHL est confronté à un problème qu’il n’attendait pas : l’histoire qu’il veut n’est pas la réalité. BHL ne peut parler de révolution puisqu’il veut une guerre. Et il ne peut parler de guerre puisque c’est une révolution. Il finit donc avec la seule réalité tangible : lui même. Et le roi est nu, et ridicule…

Le problème de BHL par BHL, pour BHL avec BHL c’est que la réalité du peuple Libyen et de sa révolution, ses avancées, sa lutte, sa réussite et surtout, évidemment, sa victoire sont étouffés sous l’égo de l’homme autant que sous les critiques de ses détracteurs : les deux sont entièrement d’accord pour dire que l’action de BHL a été réelle et que sans l’intervention de l’OTAN, Kadhafi ne serait jamais tombée.

En clair l’homme blanc a amené la démocratie en Libye. Pour BHL c’est bien, pour ses détracteurs c’est irresponsable de donner la démocratie aux arabes puisqu’ils vont aller vers l’islamisme. Problème, aucune de ces deux positions n’accepte la réalité de la révolution libyenne : les Libyens se sont soulevés contre Kadhafi tout seuls le 15 février 2011 et à cette époque BHL ne savait pas placer Benghazi sur une carte.

Non, le 2 février 2011, BHL, comme tout le monde, se demande avec inquiétude si l’Egypte post-Moubarak va « renégocier le traité de paix avec Israel » et évidemment se paye le filage inévitable de la métaphore du printemps arabe qui deviendra l’hiver islamiste des frères musulmans.

En 13 jours, BHL a su flairer l’opportunité d’une intervention militaire dont sa carrière médiatique a besoin.

Avec cette prémonition du prophète auto-réalisateur (et auto-acteur) :
“Ce 28 février, où j’écris, rien ne dit que ce peuple vaillant, admirable de détermination et de dignité, ne viendra pas à bout, seul, et dans des délais brefs, d’un tyran dont il a déjà su montrer qu’il était aussi minable que fou furieux.”

Au passage : la révolution va échouer, l’armée égyptienne est l’armée de la liberté, l’an 2 en France = 2011 dans le monde arabe (qui a naturellement deux bons siècles de retard), Un libyen = un égyptien = un tunisien et les frontières nationales de ces pays n’ont pas vraiment à être respectées car tous ces gens sont des arabes.

C’est en réussissant à ne jamais se départir de cette vision orientaliste et coloniale que le rôle profondément anachronique de BHL sera en réalité inutile sur le plan de l’histoire et catastrophique sur le plan historiographique (la façon dont l’histoire est écrite).

D’abord, rien n’indique que la révolution Libyenne aurait été définitivement écrasée sans une intervention militaire de l’OTAN. La volonté de Kadhafi de massacrer tout le monde est certaine mais on peut voir en Syrie qu’aucun massacre n’a encore pu stopper la révolution. On a aussi l’exemple de plusieurs villes Libyennes, Misruta en particulier qui ont payé un énorme tribu mais ont néanmoins résisté de longs mois sans intervention. Ce n’est pas pour prendre position contre l’intervention de l’OTAN, à laquelle nous étions favorables, simplement rappeler que rien ne permet d’affirmer que la révolution aurait été écrasée définitivement et que Kadhafi ne serait pas tombé sans intervention militaire de l’OTAN. C’est le premier mensonge de BHL.

Ensuite, rien n’indique que BHL ait contribué de quelque manière que ce soit à une intervention militaire déjà décidée par les membres de l’OTAN et avalisée par l’ONU (où il ne bénéficie d’aucune de ses ficelles). C’est le second mensonge.

BHL croit à ses mensonges car il a passé toute son action en Libye à donner corps aux fantasmes orientalistes que les média voulaient avoir.

Les média voulaient des révolutionnaires naifs, tribaux, pouilleux, désordonnés, incompétents face à un dictateur sanguinaire et un « occident » dont l’interventionnisme aux relents coloniaux est à rapprocher de l’Iraq pour les débats d’experts. BHL va leur donner point par point tous ces éléments.

Quand les média veulent de l’occident interventionniste et colonialiste ils trouvent BHL en agent secret qui arrange l’intervention auprès de Sarkozy (le président de l’homme africain pas entré dans l’histoire). Lorsqu’ils veulent du rebelle couleur locale (pouilleux assis par terre et qui mange avec les doigts) ils ont BHL assis par terre à manger « du mouton au riz graisseux » dans le désert avec des chefs de tribus. Lorsqu’ils veulent de la Libye tribale BHL leur réunit les chefs tribaux et leur fait signer un appel à une Libye unie, amplifiant ainsi artificiellement le rôle politique des tribu dans la révolution.  A ceux (il y en a) qui veulent de la France coloniale avec un soupçon de complot judeo-sioniste international, BHL va leur faire un discours colonial devant des libyens qui agitent des drapeaux francais :   « Jeunesse de Benghazi, libres tribus de la Libye libre, l’homme qui vous parle est le libre descendant d’une des plus anciennes tribus du monde » puis aller affirmer que c’est par son sionisme et sa judéité qu’il a fait ce qu’il a fait. Malgré celà, on sent bien que l’argument sioniste ou judaique n’a rien à faire dans le débat.

BHL n’incarne pas le juif ni le sioniste, il incarne le blanc dans sa plus pure tradition coloniale. Le blanc sauveur de l’arabe aux prises avec son dictateur arabe. BHL « n’y connaissant rien en stratégie militaire » mais dont on apprécie les conseils stratégiques tellement son ignorance de blanc est de toute façon supérieure à ce que la révolution arabe peut produire comme chefs militaires arabe.

BHL le blanc sachant utiliser la technologie de blanc (téléphone satellitaire, ordinateur aux côtés de l’inutile arabe et de son inutile mais exotique prière)
Image du film de BHL le serment de Tobrouk, du Huffington Post).

BHL capable de discuter avec les grands blancs (Cameron, Sarkozy, Clinton, Netnyahu…) BHL paternaliste expliquant aux Libyens tribaux comment on se comporte dans le salon d’un blanc. BHL le blanc qui peut, BHL le blanc qui sauve, BHL le blanc qui « comprend » le tribalisme Libyen, BHL le blanc chevalier blanc à la chemise blanche : BHL peau blanche masque noire pour paraphraser Fanon.

BHL ne s’est pas mis au service de la révolution mais il a mis la révolution à son service. Pour avoir un accès direct avec les grands blancs de ce monde. Et c’est au festival de Cannes qu’il choisit de présenter son film, pas en projection plein air dans Benghazi libérée.

BHL barbouzard colonial opportuniste s’est auto attribué un mandat officiel dans une révolution qui n’est pas la sienne et qu’à ce titre il ne reconnaît pas. Si BHL peut faire la guerre sans l’aimer, il est bien incapable de faire la révolution en l’aimant (comme a pu le faire la remarquable Stéphanie Lamy dont le rôle réel et la modestie sont seul comparable à l’égo et l’inutilité de BHL).

Mais BHL est l’incarnation d’un anachronisme : il veut être un héro romantique de la révolution arabe tel que le fut Lawrence d’Arabie mais finit en bouffon ridicule aussi comique que Lawrence fut tragique. Là où Lawrence tentait sans succès d’instrumentaliser le colonialisme au profit de l’indépendance arabe, BHL fait l’inverse. Il tente d’instrumentaliser la révolution arabe au profit de sa seule figure coloniale. Faire de la révolution l’aventure coloniale de BHL afin que le débat lui soit toujours favorable.*

Un colonialisme pro-BHL (le blanc il doit amener la démocratie à l’arabe) ou un colonialisme anti-BHL (le blanc il doit pas amener la démocratie à l’arabe) ainsi que le résume Anne Sinclair dans le huffington post. Personne n’acceptant le simple fait que ce n’est pas le blanc qui amène la démocratie à l’arabe et que BHL est un microscopique petit globule insignifiant dans une histoire qui touche plusieurs millions d’acteurs, directs ou indirects. Il est la goutte d’huile coloniale dans l’océan révolutionnaire : les deux ne se mélangent pas et c’est soit l’un soit l’autre. Lorsqu’on les sépare, la goutte d’huile devient aussi importante que l’océan et BHL gagne son pari médiatique.

Même l’excellent Boniface s’y laisse prendre. Après avoir pourtant réussis à séparer la prise de position de BHL (pour une intervention sans mandat de l’ONU) de la véritable intervention militaire qui mettait en place la « responsabilité de protéger », Boniface tombe dans le piège des variations sur le thème « c’est pas si bien qu’on le dit depuis la chute de Kadhafi »

Même problème pour l’excellente Audrey Pulvar, obligée, pour critiquer BHL de salir la révolution qu’il aurait soutenu. Et encore même problème pour Bruno Roger Petit qui attaque Pulvar et Polny mais en défendant le colonialisme socialiste de BHL. Un anachronisme total mais que BHL refait vivre et remet au cœur du débat.

Ni Boniface ni Pulvar ni Bruno Roger Petit ni aucun des détracteurs ni défenseurs de BHL n’accepte comme prémisse que BHL n’a jamais soutenu la révolution et n’a joué qu’un rôle médiatique d’anachronisme colonial dans un événement historique inédit. BHL a simplement transformé une révolution arabe Libyenne que personne ne voulait voir en une guerre civile avec intervention “occidentale” que tout le monde pouvait comprendre. La révolution n’est pas finie mais BHL a gagné la guerre.

Cette négation de la révolution par « la guerre sans l’aimer » de BHL convient à tout le monde car elle permet de retrouver le concept O combien colonial du bon et du mauvais arabe. Un concept orientaliste qui a été perdu avec la révolution arabe mais dont on a beaucoup de mal à se défaire et que BHL permet de réhabiliter pour le plus grand confort intellectuel de ses opposants et partisans. Avec le bon et le mauvais arabe, l’essentiel est de faire porter le débat sur qui est le bon et qui est le mauvais. On peut distribuer les points que l’on veut :

Le bon arabe c’est celui qui accepte de se laisser bombarder pour son bien : le Libyen.
le mauvais arabe c’est celui qui refuse de se faire bombarder pour le bien commun (le palestinien par exemple).
Le bon arabe c’est celui qui reste chez lui, le mauvais celui qui veut venir « chez nous »
La bonne révolution arabe c’est celle qui se fait avec intervention possible de l’OTAN, la mauvaise celle qui va déboucher sur la Charia (comme en Egypte, Tunisie, Libye…)
Le bon arabe c’est l’arabe soumis au colonialisme touristique comme le Tunisien ou l’Egyptien, le mauvais arabe c’est celui qui possède beaucoup d’argent et « notre » pétrole comme le Saoudien qui voile sa femme ou le Quatari qui rachète nos équipes de foot.
Le bon arabe c’est le sunnite pro-occidental, le mauvais arabe c’est le chiite pro-iranien.
Le bon arabe islamiste c’est celui qui veut un islamisme sur modèle non arabe turque. Le mauvais arabe islamiste c’est celui qui veut un islamisme sur modèle non arabe iranien.
Le bon arabe révolutionnaire c’est le laïque, le mauvais arabe révolutionnaire c’est l’islamiste
etc.

C’est une lutte sans merci est-ce que le bon arabe, avec l’aide du socialisme colonial style BHL va triompher ? Ou alors est-ce que l’extrême droite réactionnaire va réussir à faire accepter comme vérité que l’arabe est foncièrement mauvais et que donc c’est le mauvais arabe qui va gagner et que les efforts des bobos socialiste sont vains?

BHL, lui, est sur de gagner à tous les coups. Les partisans du bon arabe deviennent automatiquement coloniaux (Bruno Roger Petit salue le rôle colonial de BHL), les anticoloniaux deviennent automatiquement d’extrême droite (et Pulvar se retrouve à attaquer BHL avec le même discours sur la Libye que Marine le Pen).

Mais dans son film, BHL n’arrive pas à mentir. Le bon arabe n’existe pas, c’est BHL qui le créé de toute pièce, c’est par lui que l’arabe devient bon, c’est lui que le bon arabe acclame à la tribune, c’est dans ses bras que l’arabe émotionnel peut pleurer, c’est à ses cotés que l’arabe combat, c’est avec son stylo que l’arabe écrit. A la fin du film BHL avertit des risques sur la Libye (charia, terrorisme, droit des femmes) : sans lui le bon arabe risque de (re)devenir mauvais.

Une posture tellement extrême que BHL devient la caricature même du socialiste colonial qu’il incarne. C’est toute la mission civilisatrice, le fardeau de l’homme blanc qui est ridiculisé et décrédibilisé. Un ridicule salutaire.

 

*Merci à ER pour ses conseils sur la correction de ce passage qui initialement se contentait de simplement comparer BHL et Lawrence oubliant de souligner le rôle comique de BHL incomparable avec une vrai figure romantique et tragique telle que Lawrence